Disabilities Awareness Week

Disabilities Awareness Week

This Disabilities Awareness Week, Students with Disabilities Part-time Officer, Chloe Morgan, talks about her struggles on campus and her accessibility report.

The university has made a lot of changes over the last few years, including a brand new campus. However, there is still a lot of work to be done on both Singleton and Bay campuses. Like many people with disabilities, this makes me worry about how the changes will affect the accessibility of the university.

It can be hard to navigate everyday life with a disability, particularly when a seemingly simple journey across campus is more like navigating a minefield of broken pavements and high kerbs. I’ve been a student here for four years now and as a result I’m used to facing these problems on a daily basis. I have gotten to know the campus, I remember where the high kerbs are as well as the broken paving stones and the loose drain covers.

I managed to identify 166 issues across the two campuses. 104 were on Singleton and 42 were on Bay. To be honest, this wasn’t entirely surprising, but it was disappointing, knowing that the university has so many issues that are making it less accessible. I have compiled a report for the university with all of the problems I found and hopefully this will prompt them to make all the necessary changes.

Of course, given some of the buildings are quite old, making certain buildings accessible would prove near impossible. However, the report focuses not on these issues, but rather issues that can easily be changed. One of the most common issues on both Bay and Singleton Campuses were uneven or damaged paving tiles, or simply no paving tiles which make accessibility almost impossible, particularly for the visually impaired as there is next to no indication of the beginning and the ends of pavements. These issues are a simple fix and can have very detrimental effects on people with disabilities as well as able-bodied people.

The publication of the report means that it’s more important than ever for us to talk about accessibility for all and it is my hope that one day Swansea University will be totally inclusive and 100% accessible.

 

Chloe’s full report can be downloaded here.

Chloe Morgan, Students with Disabilities Part-time Officer.

Wythnos Ymwybyddiaeth Anableddau

Mae hi'n Wythnos Ymwybyddiaeth Anableddau, ac mae Swyddog Myfyrwyr ag Anableddau Rhan-amser, Chloe Morgan, yn trafod ei thrafferthion ar y campws a'i hadroddiad hygyrchedd.

The University has made a lot of changes over the last few years, including a brand new campus. However, there is still a lot of work to be done on both Singleton and Bay campuses. Like many people with disabilities, this makes me worry about how the changes will affect the accessibility of the university.

It can be hard to navigate everyday life with a disability, particularly when a seemingly simple journey across campus is more like navigating a minefield of broken pavements and high kerbs. I’ve been a student here for four years now and as a result I’m used to facing these problems on a daily basis. I have gotten to know the campus, I remember where the high kerbs are as well as the broken paving stones and the loose drain covers.

I managed to identify 166 issues across the two campuses. 104 were on Singleton and 42 were on Bay. To be honest, this wasn’t entirely surprising, but it was disappointing, knowing that the university has so many issues that are making it less accessible. I have compiled a report for the university with all of the problems I found and hopefully this will prompt them to make all the necessary changes.

Of course, given some of the buildings are quite old, making certain buildings accessible would prove near impossible. However, the report focuses not on these issues, but rather issues that can easily be changed. One of the most common issues on both Bay and Singleton Campuses were uneven or damaged paving tiles, or simply no paving tiles which make accessibility almost impossible, particularly for the visually impaired as there is next to no indication of the beginning and the ends of pavements. These issues are a simple fix and can have very detrimental effects on people with disabilities as well as able-bodied people.

The publication of the report means that it’s more important than ever for us to talk about accessibility for all and it is my hope that one day Swansea University will be totally inclusive and 100% accessible.


 

Gellir lawrlwytho yr adroddiad llawn yma.

Chloe Morgan, Swyddog Myfyrwyr ag Anableddau Rhan-amser.

 

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